Next Scrap

This beautiful piece of wood was passed on from an instrument builder, it looks like a perfect species for a fretboard. It’s 1-1/4″ thick. I desire 7/8″ for dice to slide, and 13/16″ is narrow enough to make them wedge.

I have some narrow gauge saw blades but not nearly so thin as a band saw blade. So if my kerf is 1/8″, I have problems. I cannot see how to make dice boxes tall enough to have the nice presentation face as a lid without using a separate 6″ slab to cut from.

It might be possible to carefully join a second piece of wood into the spare 4″ scrap from four 6″ boxes, but pairing this wood with something uninspiring is unattractive. I don’t have an acrylic mix, which might be fun.

I’m unsure how to finish this wood, too. Is linseed going to darken it? I used linseed on Jesse’s bass neck and it was perfect, but that was totally different wood. I guess it would be sensible to cut a piece off the end and treat it to see the effect.

Maple dice box

I came across a 2×6 scrap of what I’ve been told is maple. I sawed it up into a few dice boxes that I’m using my router to hollow. Each is going to be finished with linseed oil, but constructed in slightly different manners. This one is the first time I’ve used brass threaded inserts, which are surprisingly fragile.

I enjoy the look of the separation that exposed the grain.

And three magnets seem to keep it closed well enough. I might use more or use bigger magnets on the next ones.

Bass of Spades assembled!

Jesse worked hard on the Bass from morning to night, with some long interruptions to build fencing around the chicken run. We started off the morning by soldering the knobs and and the pickups.

It took filing a rough spot on the bridge and flux to get the ground wire soldered to the bridge. Then we used a chisel to carve a spot for the solder bump.

Before I knew it, Jesse had punded in the peg post collars and had put the neck on the body.

He was really excited to get his first string on a peg!

After dinner, Jesse had screwed most of the pickups on. He unfortunately broke a drill bit of in the body when sinking pilot holes for the low pickup. We had to drill some surrounding area out and use needle nose to back out the bit. And when we did, Jesse got right on to adjusting his bridge.

We finished off the evening listening to Red Hot Chilli Peppers and Primus.

Staining the Bass of Spades

Jesse has named it The Bass of Spades. We gave a second coat of stain to the headstock and only coat was needed for the body. The neck/fretboard got boiled linseed oil.

The twine on the body unspun itself and it dropped to the floor. Retied it

Building a bass, 1

Jesse is building an electric bass guitar from a kit we bought from Reverb. We need to sand and finish the neck and body. Then we solder the electronics together. The results will be gratifying.

To focus on using supplies we have, we decided to use a darker teak stain for the body and headstock. The fretboard we will treat with linseed oil.

Restoring a Hand Plane

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The bottom of the handle is up, with a sharpened dowel pointed into the reference hole for the top of the handle

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The top of the handle is fixed in the drill jig

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after drilling with forstner bit, the socket fits

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the 1/4″ washer fits inside the widened recess

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Hand tightening with a 7/16 socket

 

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the nylock nut is tight

Projector Screen

This took quite a bit of time to complete. The BUF IT committee had to discuss, research and get various agreements. We had to create a floor plan and learn how to compute distance ratios to see which model of projector would work well. Getting electricians took forever. And then we needed to change the color of the projector screen case. Coffee colored duct tape seemed the best choice, easier to obtain than colored adhesive vinyl. We strung the screen up with paracord for a few weeks to allow stakeholders the opportunity to change the height of the screen.

Today we got up the ladder again and replaced the paracord with steel cables and turnbuckles. I got them tensioned sufficiently in place that we didn’t notice a change in focus when we turned the projector on again. This screen and the projector took over a year on the calendar, and about four weekends this summer to install.