Table Saw Maintenance

These wheels will save my back. Made out of a 2×6 and 6in wheels with 6in iron rods as axles.

Making the wooden brackets was fun. They could be more secure, but I didn’t have time to snip up some nail plate and dig up small sheet metal screws.

The more frustrating part of this saw is that the bevel alignment is the weakest part. The BPS15 model has a really weak attachment between the bevel handle and the pinion gear. I drilled opposing holes through the back of the knob and screwed it in place.

Next the bevel adjustment bolts to make 0 and 45 angles correct are also kind of a joke. You loosen them and it actually just frees part if the saw bracing from the housing. I would really rather have seen a better mechanism, like an offset screw. Crappy.

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Troll dice

Made these out of a reclaimed piece of 4×10. Threw out quite a bit of eaten wood and threw out the ones that started to issue termites.

Next time, I will use forstner bits or drill ahead of time and trim them down on the table saw to correct the chip out.

Rain Barrels

Some notes on making rain barrels. First: I decided that the most likely way for a self-installed bib to fail would be to drill and install it myself. The barrels I got lacked lids, so I couldn’t reach into them to hold a backing nut in place. Bellingham doesn’t have a place that stocks bung caps, so I ordered them on line. I got the brass fittings at hardware sales. I decided to go with a ball valve. Simple, quick to get maximum flow.

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So the top of the barrels are now the rounded bottoms. I drilled a four-inch hole in there, pretty close to the middle. This is because the elbows on the downspout go out to about six-inches.

The overflows are a pair of 1.5″ holes with 1.5in-1.25in threaded iron transitions. I used a linoleum knife to carve the holes wider. Do not use a spade bit, use a 1″ hole saw.

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The barrels are white now because I primed them. I’ll paint them soon. I wanted to put some screen into the inlet to try and keep leaf and moss garbage out of it. I’m also going to screen off the overflows, but I suspect that normal window screen is not going to keep mosquitoes out.

There is not a good way to put screen inside the four inch downspout transition, so I decided to cut the bottom out of some small deli tubs which happened to be about 4 inches wide. there is a pretty tight fit between the transition and these ad hoc screen brackets. The trick to getting the screen to fit in is to cut triangular gaps out of the sides of the screen squares.

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Replacing a loud fan in my home ZFS NAS

The blue-LED fan I have in my ZFS on Linux NAS is a bit louder than the other fans that I’ve been hoping for. I am going to replace it with a 600rpm fan.

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You will notice that I have drilled extra ventilation into the top case panel.

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Notice the clear-plastic fan. It is held in with zip ties.

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Zip tied those SAS cables to tidy them up.

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See the 140mm low profile fan on the cpu? Pretty quiet. 120mm 600 rpm exit fan.

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Let’s snip some zippies!

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Getting the fan power connected is always a chore. My fingers are almost too big.

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Fan is now attached and power cables are managed well enough.

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Trim it up.

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Plenty of inlet.

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Now I put it up on it’s shelf and get it plugged in.

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and there’s a power switch at the farthest point back there.

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Alright. Powered up and out of the way.

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DIY Spirograph

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I saw this in a maker book and I must say that the editing of the book was deplorable. It was edited for brevity and not for guidance. This will need a complete rebuild to actually work.

DIY Travel Mug Lid

DIY Travel Mug Lid

How did I make this lid?

I lose lids off of travel mugs frequently. The great shame of travel mugs is the cheap caps that just fly off, into traffic, when biking. For a while I had been using lids from other disposable coffee cups. But then I found a lid to an empty peanut butter jar. So, pop quiz: how did I make this bad boy by spending no money on it?

Standing Workstation 2012

I’ve been computing at a standing workstation since 2010, and since then I haven’t had my lower back bother me for a while. When beginning my new job at Candela Technologies, I got a new workstation and decided to build…eh…over-build an adjustable multi-monitor standing workstation. Turns out it looks a lot like a mining frame from the 19th century. Wish I had some brass parts, then it would be Steampunk.

I really did want to do the triple-portrait mode for my monitors, but while I’m sure I could have gotten some magic done with Xrandr, I did need to get to work, and the ATI driver would not correctly generate something that Java, XFCE, Gnome or Unity would display properly on. I took this into account when building the swing-arms, so I use it landscape mode.

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